Category Archives: Care Delivery Innovations

What Academic Medical Centers Can Learn from Lippi

By James McDeavitt, MD

Originally posted July 7, 2015

512px-fra_filippo_lippi_-_madonna_with_the_child_and_two_angels_-_wga13307What does this 15th century Renaissance painting have to do with a 21st century academic medical center?

Painted by Fra’ Filippo Lippi (a monk of some questionable repute) in about 1465, I selected this image as an analogy for our two broad challenges in building a successful academic medical enterprise in the rapidly changing healthcare environment.

The first challenge is the need to innovate.

At first blush, Lippi’s Madonna With Child and Two Angels may not scream innovation. However, in its time it included a number of groundbreaking techniques. Continue reading What Academic Medical Centers Can Learn from Lippi

UAB Medicine Issues Innovation Challenges to Frontline Employees

By Jennifer J. Salopek

socialized_medicineWith more than 5,000 employees, the folks at UAB Medicine knew that there were good ideas out there. But how to uncover them? Melissa Mancini, director of strategy and business development, wanted to engage frontline employees on a social platform along the lines of what she had seen at Dell and Starbucks. The foundation was firm: UAB Medicine had established a formal innovation program three years before, with such features as a solid infrastructure, an innovation board—even an internal venture capital fund, which makes small ($5,000-$10,000) proof-of-concept grants to employees who submit worthy ideas. Partnering with consulting firm Imaginatik, Mancini and her team issued the first innovation challenge to employees in June 2014: “How can we improve the patient experience and daily efficiency?” Continue reading UAB Medicine Issues Innovation Challenges to Frontline Employees

Writers Call on Public Sector to Establish National Innovations Database

Latest post in the series arising from our partnership with Healthcare: The Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation. Read more about the partnership here.

???????????????????By Jennifer J. Salopek

Could a national database, populated with descriptions of innovative initiatives and their results, help to accelerate the pace of change in health care delivery reform? A trio of authors, writing in Healthcare: The Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation, thinks so, and lays out their proposed model in their March 2015 article, “Crowd-sourcing delivery system innovation: A public–private solution.” Wing of Zock spoke recently with corresponding author Craig Tanio, MD.

Continue reading Writers Call on Public Sector to Establish National Innovations Database

Second Annual #Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project Launches This Summer

Originally published June 16, 2015

By Sonya Collins

For the second year, the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers (CCHP), Primary Care Progress (PCP), and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) are collaborating on the Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project. The initiative gives interdisciplinary teams of health professions students an unparalleled hands-on opportunity to learn and practice an innovative model of health care coordination called hotspotting. Here, program partners weigh in on why hotspotting is important and the new elements participants can expect this year.

“The average health professions student is told that their job is to shadow and wait their turn. This project gets them off the sidelines and engaged in a meaningful way,” says Andrew Morris-Singer, a general internist and president of PCP. Continue reading Second Annual #Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project Launches This Summer

Health Wearables and the Yeshwant Table

By Benjamin Robbins

Hundreds of people gathered in an event space in Google’s Cambridge, MA, office last month to demo the latest in health wearables and watch the final round of a health tech competition co-sponsored by Google, Anthem, MedTech Boston, and Medstro.com. The event suggests  that we may be seeing a striking evolution of fitness-oriented health wearables to devices with the potential to improve patient care.

I’ll admit that I had relatively low expectations – imagining walking into a room full of devices designed to keep already-healthy people marginally more healthy. However, when I arrived I was struck by the number of knowledgeable medical experts who had built devices that seemed like they could truly help alleviate or prevent suffering caused by disease.

Continue reading Health Wearables and the Yeshwant Table

Changing Health Care from the Front Lines

By Joanne Conroy, MD

There are hundreds of books published every year that make contributions to our collective knowledge, but very few of them create real impact. Many stop at the first step on the continuum that ranges from acquiring knowledge, understanding what to do with that knowledge to solve problems, and successfully implementing solutions. A new book can move engaged providers, patients, and policy makers through that important evolution.

Continue reading Changing Health Care from the Front Lines

Bringing Design Thinking to Health Care Innovation

By Alexander Bolt

Dell Medical School and the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin are collaborating on an innovative new project called the Design Institute for Health.

“This Institute will systematically use design and creativity to create better health outcomes at lower costs, increase value in the health care system, and improve the lives of patients and providers,” said Beto Lopez, who will serve as managing director. Continue reading Bringing Design Thinking to Health Care Innovation

Sophisticated Information Technology Informs Patient Care at Intermountain

By Jennifer J. Salopek

Utah’s Intermountain Health has been using sophisticated information technology systems to track patient outcomes and prompt best practices for 15 years, and has had electronic health records for 40 years, says Stanley M. Huff, MD, Chief Medical Informatics Officer. Huff shared many of Intermountain’s challenges and successes in a session at the AAMC annual meeting in Chicago in November. Huff is also a clinical professor at the University of Utah, where he teaches a course in medical information standards, which he describes as “a big help to analytics.” A key challenge in data-driven medicine, according to Huff, is “getting good, standard, structured, coded data to the people who do the analytics.”

Continue reading Sophisticated Information Technology Informs Patient Care at Intermountain