Category Archives: Community Engagement

Second Annual #Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project Launches This Summer

Originally published June 16, 2015

By Sonya Collins

For the second year, the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers (CCHP), Primary Care Progress (PCP), and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) are collaborating on the Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project. The initiative gives interdisciplinary teams of health professions students an unparalleled hands-on opportunity to learn and practice an innovative model of health care coordination called hotspotting. Here, program partners weigh in on why hotspotting is important and the new elements participants can expect this year.

“The average health professions student is told that their job is to shadow and wait their turn. This project gets them off the sidelines and engaged in a meaningful way,” says Andrew Morris-Singer, a general internist and president of PCP. Continue reading Second Annual #Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project Launches This Summer

Personalized Medicine, Disney Style

By Ulfat Shaikh, MD

As a pediatrician, I make it part of my personal continuing education goals to keep up with the latest in children’s entertainment. Big Hero 6, Disney’s latest animated feature film, did not disappoint. It introduced me to Baymax, a potential future health care colleague I can look up to. Continue reading Personalized Medicine, Disney Style

Tulane Medical Students Learn About Health As Well As Health Care

By Jennifer J. Salopek

Do doctors who eat better provide better care? Tim Harlan believes they do. Educating medical students and residents about healthy foods and their preparation is central to the mission of the Goldring Center for Culinary Education at Tulane University, which Harlan directs. Both a trained chef and a doctor, Harlan is committed to showing future doctors—and the patients and communities they serve—that good-for-you foods can taste good too. In a high-fat, high-salt, high-alcohol environment like New Orleans, where the obesity rate is five points higher than the national average, that’s a crucial message to get across.

Continue reading Tulane Medical Students Learn About Health As Well As Health Care

Innovative High and Middle School Programs Can Increase Pipeline Diversity

By Marc Nivet, EdD, MBA, and Jennifer J. Salopek

As educational institutions seek to address the looming doctor shortage in the United States and to create a physician workforce that more closely resembles the patient population, programs that help to create diverse and inclusive environments—such as high and middle school pipeline programs—can help us to meet these goals. Medical students across the country have worked to create programs in their communities that open up the possibilities of careers in medicine. This work must be encouraged, promoted, and replicated.

Continue reading Innovative High and Middle School Programs Can Increase Pipeline Diversity

Notes From The Hotspotters: Trouble At Home

Originally posted December 2, 2014

By Rebecca Bausinger

Heading into Section 8 housing – also known as “the projects” – our hotspotting team was not sure what to expect. Our task ahead was daunting — we had yet to enroll any of our four required patients. This would be my first home health experience. For a health care provider, going into a patient’s home can be nerve-wracking if you are not used to it. I was glad to have two of my teammates by my side. 
Continue reading Notes From The Hotspotters: Trouble At Home

Health Care Professional Students Learn to Hotspot

Originally published October 6, 2014

By Sonya Collins

This summer marked the launch of the 2014 Hotspotting Mini-Grant Project. The initiative, a collaboration between Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers (CCHP), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and Primary Care Progress (PCP), gives health professional students an unprecedented hands-on opportunity to learn and practice an innovative model of health care delivery called hotspotting.

Continue reading Health Care Professional Students Learn to Hotspot

Partnering with Patients, Families, and Communities: An Urgent Imperative for Health Care

By George Thibault, MD

In 1978, primary care leaders from around the globe met in Alma Alta (now part of Kazakhstan) and declared that all patients should have the “right and duty to participate individually and collectively” in planning and implementing their health care.  Thirty six years later, US health care leaders continue to wrestle with how to meaningfully achieve that goal in this century.  Although great strides have been made to fix, reform, transform and revolutionize US health care, we have been less effective at making sure those who care, learn, teach or work within that system can truly partner with patients. Continue reading Partnering with Patients, Families, and Communities: An Urgent Imperative for Health Care

Hopkins Leverages Innovation Hub Model at Sibley Hospital

By Jennifer J. Salopek

Amid frosted glass walls and brightly colored furniture, the meeting attendees cautiously approach the tables stocked with Post-It notes, crayons, Play-Doh, and duct tape in neon colors. Although the purpose of these supplies might be obvious to people familiar with design thinking, their usefulness is less apparent to the folks gathered at Sibley Hospital in Washington, DC, in late July. This is the first meeting of the Design Team on Healthy Aging, which is being held at Sibley’s brand-new Innovation Hub. The attendees, Sibley employees and representatives of local community organizations, will participate in a rapid 90-day iteration process to develop a new product or service.

Continue reading Hopkins Leverages Innovation Hub Model at Sibley Hospital