Category Archives: Health Care Innovation

Left Behind: Why Excluding Residents from Delivery System Reform Hurts Us All

Several weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend a meeting at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) on a new mandatory payment model for joint replacement. I was the only resident physician among the more than 70 health professionals at the meeting. What I learned is that for most trainees in medical school and residency, little time is spent understanding the nuances of health care finance or practice management. Continue reading Left Behind: Why Excluding Residents from Delivery System Reform Hurts Us All

Creating a Culture of High Value Care at Massachusetts General Hospital

Three in four physicians stated that unnecessary tests and procedures contribute to the high cost of health care in the United States, according to a survey conducted by PerryUndem Research/Communication. In recent years, medical societies and health care professionals alike have begun to speak out on the overutilization of tests and its harmful effects on health. Nilay Patel, MD, an internal medicine resident at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), understands that we must shift away from our “more is better” culture. That shift can start by equipping residents with the proper knowledge, skills, and tools to promote a culture of high-value care among their patients.

Cost-Value of Patient Care

Patel partnered with his faculty advisor, Ryan Thompson, MD, to investigate MGH residents’ knowledge of the relationship between cost and value due to residency program curriculum, and their consideration of cost–value during daily patient activities. The results were startling: Only 35 percent of residents felt that the current curriculum prepared them to consider the cost–value of patient care during delivery; fewer than 50 percent of residents considered cost–value of procedures and tests on a daily basis.
“These results verified that there was a need for a new, innovative curriculum to train internal medicine residents at MGH in the delivery of high-value care,” said Patel.

Continue reading Creating a Culture of High Value Care at Massachusetts General Hospital

Helping Babies Breathe: Resident Spotlight at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Part two of a five part series on the 2014 AAMC Clinical Care Innovation Challenge Pilot Award Winners
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Several years ago in Brazil, medical student Anatalia Labilloy witnessed a newborn die in the delivery room when the care team could not properly perform neonatal resuscitation. The experience left an indelible memory with her. She was early in her medical training and she was anxious about encountering other occasions to resuscitate babies knowing what could happen. Now as a resident at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Labilloy is practicing vital resuscitation skills to help babies breathe.

Continue reading Helping Babies Breathe: Resident Spotlight at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Medicine and Video Games: A New Approach to Engaging Diabetic Patients

Part one of a five part series on the 2014 AAMC Clinical Care Innovation Challenge Pilot Award Winners
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Imagine this video game scenario:  a player explores a small town participating in everyday activities aimed to help them better understand and manage type 2 diabetes.  The player wanders into the local town café, and is asked to pick out a snack that is suitable to their dietary needs.

DiabetesGame
Dapper, the online video game that seeks to improve the health of type 2 diabetic patients

Continue reading Medicine and Video Games: A New Approach to Engaging Diabetic Patients

At Stanford #MedX | ED, Breakthroughs and a Prescription for Change

By Jennifer J. Salopek

As editor of Wing of Zock for the past four years, I have had the honor of learning about hundreds, perhaps thousands, of innovative ideas to reimaging medical education. On the first day of the inaugural Stanford Medicine X | ED conference Wednesday, I got enough new ideas to fuel a year’s worth of posts. A diverse lineup of presenters—educators, students, and patients—collectively created, through words, images, videos, and music, a vision of a possible future for medical education. They reported on promising innovations in medical education that aim to better prepare the doctors of tomorrow. Accompanied by colored lights, diffuse video backgrounds, and a varied soundtrack, the high-energy atmosphere that is the hallmark of Stanford Medicine X pervaded a conference on medical education. Continue reading At Stanford #MedX | ED, Breakthroughs and a Prescription for Change

What Academic Medical Centers Can Learn from Lippi

By James McDeavitt, MD

Originally posted July 7, 2015

512px-fra_filippo_lippi_-_madonna_with_the_child_and_two_angels_-_wga13307What does this 15th century Renaissance painting have to do with a 21st century academic medical center?

Painted by Fra’ Filippo Lippi (a monk of some questionable repute) in about 1465, I selected this image as an analogy for our two broad challenges in building a successful academic medical enterprise in the rapidly changing healthcare environment.

The first challenge is the need to innovate.

At first blush, Lippi’s Madonna With Child and Two Angels may not scream innovation. However, in its time it included a number of groundbreaking techniques. Continue reading What Academic Medical Centers Can Learn from Lippi

Quick Hits: Innovation in Academic Medicine

Boston Children’s Hospital Uses Social Media Data for Health Research

Social media pervades the U.S. today. Take Twitter, for example. By the end of 2014, approximately one in five U.S. adults were active Twitter users. While the network remains most popular with adults under 50 years old, the last year saw a jump in tweeters 65 and older.

Despite growing privacy concerns, users of Twitter and other networks routinely talk about their health on social media. This has created a large and growing body of data and presented an opportunity to capture ‘digital phenotypes’ that provide tremendous insight into both individual and population health. These phenotypes let us:

  1. Identify individual patients suffering from acute or chronic disease and analyze their behavior over-time
  2. Monitor the health of a population by tracking the prevalence of infectious diseases (e.g., influenza)… MORE

Duke Practical Playbook to Provide Technical Assistance to BUILD Health Challenge Awardees

The BUILD Health Challenge announced today that it awarded grants to 18 groundbreaking projects that aim to improve health in low-income communities.

The projects were recognized on the strengths of their bold, upstream, integrated, local and data-driven approaches to address the social and environmental factors that have the greatest impact on health.

The BUILD Health Challenge was founded by The Advisory Board Company, the de Beaumont Foundation, the Colorado Health Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to encourage community partnerships among local non-profit organizations, hospitals and health systems, and health departments to improve the health and well-being of their residents… MORE

Stanford Medicine to Lead, Define Field of Precision Health

Precision health was the theme of the day at Stanford [two weeks ago], with Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, describing to a standing-room-only crowd at a Town Hall event how Stanford Medicine will continue to lead and excel in this area.

Minor, along with colleagues Amir Dan Rubin, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care, and Christopher Dawes, president and CEO of Stanford Children’s Health, offered faculty, staff and students a glimpse of the future of precision health here… MORE

Developing Apps to Improve the Health of Patients at Mount Sinai

The Sinai AppLab, a pioneering digital initiative between the departments of Medicine and Information Technology, is creating technology platforms to address the needs of patients, health care providers, and researchers within the Mount Sinai Health System. Under the direction of Ashish Atreja, MD, MPH, Chief Technology Innovation and Engagement Officer in the Department of Medicine, the lab has developed five apps and an app platform that connect to Mount Sinai’s Electronic Health Records (EHR)… MORE

 

A Conversation with Clay Johnston, Inaugural Dean of Dell Medical School

By Jennifer J. Salopek

Johnston, Clay 2014 (Photo by Marsha Miller)

S. Claiborne “Clay” Johnston, MD, was named inaugural dean of the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin in January 2014. A practicing neurologist, he was formerly associate vice chancellor of research at the University of California, San Francisco. He spoke with Wing of Zock Editor Jennifer Salopek by telephone on May 13, 2015.

Salopek: What opportunities for innovation does being the dean of a new medical school bring?

Johnston: It’s a huge opportunity. If you’re ready to take on the challenge, you can take a look at all aspects of academic medicine—the way we train medical students, the way we train residents, the way we provide clinical care, the way we interact with the community. We really have an opportunity to rethink the whole academic enterprise.

Salopek: You’ve published an article called “10 Backward Things About Our Health Care System.” Which of those problems can a new kind of medical school address? For example, many that you cite are payment issues. Continue reading A Conversation with Clay Johnston, Inaugural Dean of Dell Medical School