Category Archives: Leadership

Left Behind: Why Excluding Residents from Delivery System Reform Hurts Us All

Several weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend a meeting at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) on a new mandatory payment model for joint replacement. I was the only resident physician among the more than 70 health professionals at the meeting. What I learned is that for most trainees in medical school and residency, little time is spent understanding the nuances of health care finance or practice management. Continue reading Left Behind: Why Excluding Residents from Delivery System Reform Hurts Us All

Verghese: #MedEd Must Restore 1:1 Training at the Bedside

By Jennifer J. Salopek

Verghese AbrahamTechnological advances in medicine and health care have caused providers to lose their human connection with patients, says noted author and teacher Abraham Verghese, MD; returning to an apprenticeship model that emphasizes training at the bedside can help to restore that connection. Verghese previewed his Wednesday Stanford MedicineX | ED keynote* in an interview last week, saying that he wants his diverse audience of students, educators, and patients to take away this key message: “Even as we change dramatically how we educate, the very nature of teaching requires more consideration than ever of the human element.”

*To watch the keynote live on Wednesday, September 23 at 5:25 PM Pacific time, click here. Continue reading Verghese: #MedEd Must Restore 1:1 Training at the Bedside

I Didn’t Need a Mentor. Did I?

 By Sarah Bryczkowski, MD

What is mentorship? According to the dictionary, a mentor is “an experienced and trusted advisor.” Mentor is synonymous with adviser, guide, guru, counselor, consultant, etc. As a verb, to mentor means to “advise or train (someone, especially a younger colleague).” A mentor is “someone who teaches or gives help and advice to a less experienced and often younger person,” synonymous with tutor, coach, counsel, lead, guide, pilot, shepherd, and show.

I would like to share my story of how mentorship helped me grow as a young female academic surgeon. I originally wrote this post in 2014 as I returned from two years of research back to clinical surgery duty. It has been slightly altered from how it originally appeared on my blog, in order to show appreciation for the new connections and mentors I have found song the way.  Before I do that, however, let me explain the two reasons why I thought I didn’t need a mentor. Continue reading I Didn’t Need a Mentor. Did I?

Bridging Innovation into Health Care Leadership

By R. Edward Howell

As I read Regina Herzlinger and colleagues’ thoughtful HBR blog post, a call to “alter how we educate future health care leaders,” I am reminded of the classic Michael J. Fox movie, Back to the Future. The writers’ assertion that “business leaders can and should partner with educators” strikes me as a return to the original training construct for health and hospital leaders, in which students in masters’ programs in health administration spent one year in the classroom and a second year under the direction of an experienced health care practitioners. Their urging of academic and business leaders to work together “to integrate the classroom into the real world” is not only timely; it is likely to be well received by the practitioners in the field.

Continue reading Bridging Innovation into Health Care Leadership

Encouraging Innovation at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

By Dennis S. Charney, MD

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai embraces collaboration, creativity, disruptive thinking, and entrepreneurship—the same principles that have guided Silicon Valley companies such as Google, Apple, and Facebook—and changed our lives. Scientific revolutions, like technological breakthroughs, occur when we pursue big ideas and challenge conventional wisdom knowing there are no guarantees.

The traditional, brick-by-brick, “development by accumulation” approach of academic medicine is simply progressing too slowly. Our society needs breakthroughs, the kind of paradigm shifts that author Thomas S. Kuhn described in his book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

Continue reading Encouraging Innovation at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

People, Not Just Institutions, Can Be Hubs of Innovation

socialized_medicineBy Jennifer J. Salopek

Kieran Murphy, MD, is an interventional radiologist at the University of Toronto who holds 62 patents; the devices he invented or improved are used more than 62,000 times per year. Murphy, who believes that interventional radiology attracts inventive people, is interested in the genesis of innovation and how it can be diffused. His research has led him to conclude that people, as well as places, can be innovation hubs. He has also demonstrated that social networks are not only evidence but drivers of innovation.

Continue reading People, Not Just Institutions, Can Be Hubs of Innovation

Health Wonk Review: Polar Vortex Edition, July 2014

Okay, so the vaunted summer polar vortex didn’t exactly bring the expected plummeting temperatures this week, but at least the oppressive humidity is lessened. Along with that refreshing change, some fresh thoughts from our Health Wonkers:

Over at InsureBlog, Henry Stern, LUTCF, CBC, kicks things off with a post on “SexistCare.” Stern reveals that the ACA mandates a whole raft of benefits specifically for women and children, but none for men. He wonders why mammograms are covered as preventive care, for example, but there are no corresponding provisions for prostate cancer screening. “Where’s the hue and cry?” he asks.

Continue reading Health Wonk Review: Polar Vortex Edition, July 2014

Trustees Can Improve Diversity Stewardship in Higher Education

By Marc A. Nivet and Anne C. Berlin

Originally posted June 5, 2014

Often the discourse on the role of boards in diversity leadership begins and ends with board composition. This is still an important cause, as it brings broad perspective and signals inclusiveness from the top down, among other net positives. But, a board’s diversity charge should go beyond composition.

Diversity is increasingly embraced as a strategic imperative and driver of institutional excellence, and as a means for competitive differentiation in a crowded market, especially when it comes to attracting top students, faculty and staff.

Continue reading Trustees Can Improve Diversity Stewardship in Higher Education